ANNA HAZARE AND PEOPLE’S REVOLUTION.

Anna has now become  the most influential person in India. He has faced criticism for his authoritarian views on justice, including death as punishment for corrupt public officials and his alleged support for forced vasectomy as a method of family planning.

Looking to above, his demand of formulating and passing the Lokpal bill according to his draft before 30th August in some ways shows his “Jiddy” attitude. But present congress leaders are showing more stubbornness. The huge support Anna is gaining day by day, may prove fatal for the present government. The whole issue’s governing factors now are “arrogance and power of “Khursi”. If some terrorist had hijacked a plane carrying Indian passengers the govt.  might have bypassed all rules and committees for sure and succumbed to their demands. This has happened in the past. I am not saying that lives of people is not important. But presently, millions are dying and go hungry because of the demon of corruption. So there must be a great urgency in resolving this issue. I think it is time for an armed revolution.

Secondly, many people feel that following parliament rules and considering other views on Lokpal Bill is equally important. One person can not say my way is the right way or high way. This view also holds water. However the present and previous governments have dragged this issue for so long that now it has become a hanging sword over their heads. So much so that the corruption issue is equated now with cancer and people of India are loosing patience and have lost trust. For this situation all politicians including opposition are criminally responsible for their abject negligence and lack of political will.

Now, under the circumstances what should be done by the smug politicians?  Much time has been lost. Anna’s health is deteriorating now, there is no time left for detail discussions and rules, years were given to formulate      n-number of bills and to curb corruption.

It is time for quick action, work day and night and find amicable solution now. We the people of India have put trust in you and have elected you to make our lives better. Just function properly or go away before we take up arms. Jay Hind.   

 

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Indian Kings & Monarchs : Various Dynasties

The power

 The following list of Indian Kings is one of several lists of incumbents. Early mythical and later documented rulers and dynasties that deemed to have ruled a portion of the Indian subcontinent and were based in South Asia will be included in this list.

Chandravanshi-Bharata-Puru-Kuru-Pandava-Kshemaka Dynasty (c. 1700 BC – 1026 AD)

Bharata Dynasty (c. 3300 -1400 BC)

Puru Dynasty (c. 1400-1200 BC)

Kuru Dynasty (c. 1400-450 BC)

Pandava/Gadu/Sandrocotto Dynasty (c.1200-1100BC)

Janjua Shahi Dynasty (964-1026 AD)

Magadhan Kings (c. 1700 BC – 550 AD)

Brihadratha Dynasty (c. 1700-799 BC)

Pradyota dynasty (799-684 BC)

Haryanka/Shishunaga Dynasty (684-424 BC)

Shakya Dynasty (c. 650-500 BC)

Nanda Dynasty (424-321 BC)

Maurya Dynasty (324-184 BC)

Shunga Dynasty (185-73 BC)

Kanva Dynasty (73-26 BC)

Western Kshatrapas

Gupta Dynasty (c. 240-550 AD)

Gopala I (756–781) Dharmapala (781–821) Devapala (821–861) Mahendrapala, Shurapala I, Vigrahapala I (861–866) Narayanapala (866–920) Rajyapala (920–952) Gopala II (952–969) Vigrahapala II (969–995) Mahipala I (995–1043) Nayapala (1043–1058) Vigrahapala III (1058–1075) Mahipala II (1075–1080) Shurapala II (1080–1082) Ramapala (1082–1124) Kumarapala (1124–1129) Gopala III (1129–1143) Madanapala (1143–1162) Govindapala (1162–1174)

Sena Empire Dynasty rule Bengal (CE 1070–CE 1230)

  • Hemanta Sen (1070 – 1096 AD)
  • Vijay Sen (1096 – 1159 AD)
  • Ballal Sen (1159 – 1179 AD)
  • Lakshman Sen (1179 – 1206 AD)
  • Vishwarup Sen (1206 – 1225 AD)
  • Keshab Sen (1225 – 1230 AD)
  • Kopperunchinga I (c.1216 – 1242 CE)
  • Kopperunchinga II (c.1243 – 1279 CE)
  • Kadunkoen (c. 550-450 BC)
  • Pandion (c. 50 BC – 50 AD), known as Pandion to Greeks and Romans

Bana Dynasty rule Magadaimandalam (c.1190-1260 AD)

Kadava Dynasty (c. 1216-1279 AD)

Pandya Dynasty (c. 550 BC – 1345)

Central Pandya Dynasty (c. 550 BC – 1311 AD)

Early Pandyas

  • Nedunj Cheliyan I (Aariyap Padai Kadantha Nedunj Cheliyan )
  • Pudappandiyan
  • Mudukudumi Paruvaludhi
  • Nedunj Cheliyan II (Pasumpun Pandiyan)
  • Nan Maran
  • Nedunj Cheliyan III (Talaiyaalanganathu Seruvendra Nedunj Cheliyan )
  • Maran Valudi
  • Musiri Mutriya Cheliyan
  • Ukkirap Peruvaluthi

First Empire

  • Kadungon (c. 600-700 AD), revived the dynasty
  • Maravarman Avani Culamani (590 AD – 620 AD)
  • Cezhiyan Cendan (620 AD – 640 AD)
  • Arikesari Maravarman Nindraseer Nedumaaran (640 AD – 674 AD)
  • Kochadaiyan Ranadhiran (675 AD – 730 AD)
  • Arikesari Parankusa Maravarman Rajasinga (730 AD – 765 AD)
  • Parantaka Nedunjadaiyan (765 AD – 790 AD)
  • Rasasingan II (790 AD – 800 AD)
  • Varagunan I (800 AD – 830 AD)
  • Sirmara Srivallabha (830 AD – 862 AD)
  • Varaguna II (862 AD – 880 AD)
  • Parantaka Viranarayana (862 AD – 905 AD)
  • Rajasima Pandian II (905 AD – 920 AD)

Pandyan Revival

  • Jatavarman Sundara Pandyan (1251–1268), revived Pandyan glory, considered one of the greatest conquerors of Southern India
  • Maravarman Sundara Pandyan
  • Maravarman Kulasekaran I (1268–1308)
  • Sundara Pandya (1308–1311), son of Maravarman Kulasekaran, fought with his brother Vira Pandya over the throne
  • Vira Pandya (1308–1311), son of Maravarman Kulasekaran, fought with his brother of Sundara Pandya over the throne, Madurai was conquered by the Khilji dynasty
  • Raja Rajasekhara (c. 1200-1500), descendant of the Pandya Dynasty, father of Ayyappan (often regarded as a Hindu deity)

Pandalam Dynasty (c.1200)

Foreign Emperors in North-Western India (c. 538 BC – 750 AD)

These empires were vast, centered in Persia or the Mediterranean; their satrapies (provinces) in India were at their outskirts.

Persian Achaemenid Dynasty (c. 538-330 BC)

Argead Dynasty (326-323 BC)

Seleucid Diadochi (323-321 BC)

Arab Umayyad Caliphate (711-750 AD)

Chera dynasty (c. 400 BC – 1314 AD)

Note that years are still disputed among the scholars, the given is only a version.

Ancient Chera Kings (c. 400 BC – 397 AD)

  1. Udiyancheralatan
  2. Antuvancheral
  3. Imayavaramban Nedun-Cheralatan (56-115 AD)
  4. Cheran Chenkutuvan (from 115)
  5. Palyanai Sel-Kelu Kuttuvan (115-130)
  6. Poraiyan Kadungo (from 115)
  7. Kalankai-Kanni Narmudi Cheral (115-140)
  8. Vel-Kelu Kuttuvan (130-185)
  9. Selvak-Kadungo (131-155)
  10. Adukotpattu Cheralatan (140-178)
  11. Kuttuvan Irumporai (178-185)
  12. Tagadur Erinda Perumcheral (185-201)
  13. Yanaikat-sey Mantaran Cheral (201-241)
  14. Ilamcheral Irumporai (241-257)
  15. Perumkadungo (257-287)
  16. Ilamkadungo (287-317)
  17. Kanaikal Irumporai (367-397)
  18. Kulashekhara Varman (800- 820 AD)- also called Kulashekhara Alwar.
  19. Rajashekhara Varman (820- 844 AD)- also called Cheraman Perumal.
  20. Sthanu ravi Varman (844- 885 AD)- contemporary of Aditya Chola
  21. Rama Varma Kulashekhara (885- 917 AD)
  22. Goda Ravi Varma (917- 944 AD)
  23. Indu Kotha Varma (944- 962 AD)
  24. Bhaskara Ravi Varman I (962- 1019 AD)
  25. Bhaskara Ravi Varman II (1019- 1021 AD)
  26. Vira Kerala (1021- 1028 AD)
  27. Rajasimha (1028- 1043 AD)
  28. Bhaskara Ravi Varman III (1043-1082 AD)
  29. Rama Varma Kulashekhara (1090 or 1020- 1102 AD)- also called Cheraman Perumal.

Kulashekhara Dynasty (1020-1314 AD)

  • Ravi Varma Kulashekhara (c. 1250-1314), last of the Cheras
  • Simuka (c. 230-207 BC)
  • Kanha (or Krishna) (207-189 BC)
  • Satakarni I
  • Hala (20-24 AD)
  • Gautamiputra Satakarni (106-130)
  • Vashishtiputra Pulumayi (130-158)
  • Vashishtiputra Satakarni (c. 158-170)
  • Sri Yajna Satakarni (c. 170-199)

Satavahana Dynasty (c. 230 BC – 199 AD)

Hellenistic Euthydemid Dynasty (c. 221-85 BC)

Unlike the far larger empires of Alexander the Great and his Seleukid diadoch, centered in the region

Chola Dynasty (c. 300 BC – 1279 AD)

Sangam Cholas (c. 300 BC – 240 AD)

Chola Emperors (848-1279 AD)

Indo-Scythian Rulers (c. 85 BC – 45 AD)

North-western India (c. 90 BC – 10 AD)

Apracharaja Rulers (12 BC – 45 AD)

Mathura area (c. 20 BC – 20 AD)

Minor local rulers

Indo-Parthian Rulers (c. 21-100 AD)

Kushana Dynasty (80-225)

Pallava Dynasty (275-882)

Early Pallavas (275-355)

Middle Pallavas (355-537)

Later Pallavas (537-882) C.E.

Kadambas of Banavasi (345-525 AD)

Western Ganga dynasty of Talakad (350-1024 AD)

Chalukya Dynasty (543-1156)

Chalukyas of Badami (543-757)

Chalukyas of Kalyani (973-1156)

Shashanka dynasty (600-626)

Harsha dynasty (606-647)

Tomar’s or Tuar’s of Sthaneshwar and Indraprastha (736 A.D. – 1192 A.D.)

From Kshemak (last Tomar king of Indraprastha and direct descendant of Parikshit) to Anangpal I –

  1. Kshemak
  2. Shunkh (Kshemak’s seat was usurped by his minister)
  3. Tunga (took refuge in Southern India established small kingdom – River Tungbhadra named after him)
  4. Abhanga
  5. Javal
  6. Gawal
  7. Lorepind
  8. Adangal
  9. Ganmel
  10. Nabhang
  11. Chukkar
  12. Tome
  13. Dravidan Tomar
  14. Drugya Tomar
  15. Manbha Tomar
  16. Karwal Tomar
  17. Kalang Tomar, he was a local chieftain in kurudesh (modern haryana).
  18. Anangpal I – re-established Tomar rule at what is now Delhi, the ancient capital of his ancestors. AD 736 – March- xx, Ruled 18Yrs
  19. Vasudev – AD 754 – March – xx, Ruled 19Y-1M-18D
  20. Gangeya Tuar – AD 773-Apr-18, Ruled 21Y-3M-28D
  21. Prithvimal – AD 794-Aug-16, Ruled 19Y-6M-19D
  22. Jagdev or Jaydev – AD 814-Mar-05, Ruled 20Y-7M-28D
  23. Narpal – AD 834-Nov-03, Ruled 14Y-4M-09D
  24. Udaysangh – AD 849-Mar-12, Ruled 26Y-7M-11D
  25. Jaidas – AD 875-Oct-23, Ruled 21Y-2M-13D
  26. Vachhal/VrikshPal – AD 897-Jan-01, Ruled 22Y-3M-16D. There were many brothers / uncles of Vacchal Tuar.
    1. Bacchdev, founded Bagor near Narnol and Bachera and Baghera near Thoda Ajmer.
    2. Nagdeo s/o Karnpal Tuar and brother of Vachhal dev, founded Nagor and Nagda near Ajmer. Karndeo Tuar himself established Bahadurgarh near Alwar.
    3. Krishnray s/o Karnpal Tuar, founded Kishangarh near Ajmer and Khas Ganj between Etah and Soron.
    4. Nihal Ray       s/o Karnpal Tuar, founded Narayanpur near Alwar.
    5. Somasi       s/o Karnpal Tuar, founded Ajabpur between present day Alwar and Jaipur
    6. Harpal s/o Karnpal Tuar, founded Harsola and Harsoli near Alwar.
    7. Pavak – AD 919-Apr-22, Ruled 21Y-6M-05D.
    8. Vihangpal – AD 940-Oct-27, Ruled 24Y-4M-04D.
    9. Tolpal – AD 961-Mar-01, Ruled 18Y-3M-15D.
      1. Gopal – either another name of Gopal or ruled on his behalf for a while.
      2. Sulakshanpal – AD 979-Jun-16, Ruled 25Y-10M-10D.
      3. Jaipal Tuar – AD 1005-Apr-26, Ruled 25Y-10M-10D. – Fought with Raja Rangatdhwaj Rathore and lost sovereignty of Kannauj.
        1. His Younger Brother Jhetpal Tuar captured Paithan and his descendants are called Pathania Rajputs.
        2. Kanvarpal/Kumara Pal Tuar – AD 1021-Aug-29, Ruled 29Y-9M-18D.(Masud, grandson of Md. Gazni, captured Hansi briefly in 1038), ruled from Bari[3] in Awadh, which was 3 days south of Kannauj.
          1. His Rajya Purohit, the chief priest, was Indrachandra whose descendant was Ramchandra ‘Rammya’, Samrat Hem Chandra Vikramaditya Hemu‘s nephew and General in his army.
          2. Anangpal II or AnekPal or Anaypal – AD 1051-Jun-17, Ruled 29Y-6M-18D.(1052 inscription on the Iron pillar at Mahrauli) ,populated Delhi and built Lalkot or Old Fort of Delhi. A few known sons of Anangpal are given here, which tell us the extent of his dominions. From Hansi in north to Agra in south and from Ajmer in west to Ganges in east, beyond which were the Katheria Rajputs rulers.
            1. Bhumpal Tomar, younger son – AD 1081, Settled in Narwar area (Near Gwalior)
            2. Indrapal, founded Indra Garh
            3. Rangraj, founded two palaces by the name of Taragarh, one near Ajmer.
            4. Achal Raj, founded Achner between Bharatpur and Agra.
            5. Draupad, lived in Hansi
            6. Sisupal, founded Sirsa, Siswal (also called Sirsa Patan)
            7. Surajpal, Suraj Kund in Mehrauli Delhi was built by him.
            8. Tejpal – AD 1081-Jan-05, Ruled 24Y-1M-06D , founded Tejora between Gurgaon and Alwar
            9. Mahipal/Junpal – AD 1105-Feb-11, Ruled 25Y-2M-23D.
            10. Dakatpal (Arkpal or Anangpal III) – AD 1151-Jul-19, Ruled till 1192 AD till the Capture of Delhi by Md. Ghori, Titular head only, lost to Someshwar dev Chauhan of Ajmer in AD 1152 and married daughter to Chauhan king and thus became a feudatory of his Chauhan son in law and later his grandson Rai Pithora of Ajmer. Prithviraj Chauhan was proclaimed the heir of Tomar Kingdom in AD 1170 and his rule was 22Y-2M-16D.
              1. Govindraj Tanwar fought for Prithviraj Chauhan and was killed in battle with Md Ghori.

Rashtrakutas of Manyaketha (735-982)

  • Dantidurga (735-756)
  • Krishna I (756-774)
  • Govinda II (774-780)
  • Dhruva Dharavarsha (780-793)
  • Govinda III (793-814)
  • Amoghavarsha I (814-878)
  • Krishna II Akalavarsha (878-914)
  • Indra III (914-929)
  • Amoghavarsha II (929-930)
  • Govinda IV (930-935)
  • Amoghavarsha III (934-939)
  • Krishna III (939-967)
  • Khottiga Amoghavarsha (967-972)
  • Karka II Amoghhavarsha IV (972-973)
  • Indra IV (973-982), only a claimer for the lost throne.
  • Lalliya (c. 890-895)
  • Kamaluka (895-921)
  • Bhima (921-964), son of Kamaluka
  • Jayapala (964-1001)
  • Anandapala (1001–1011)
  • Roopak (1011–1022)
  • Bhímapála (1022–1026)
  • Upendra (c 800-c 818)
  • Vairisimha I (c 818-c 843)
  • Siyaka I (c 843-c 893)
  • Vakpati (c 893-c 918)
  • Vairisimha II (c 918-c 948)
  • Siyaka II (c 948-c 974)
  • Vakpatiraja (c 974-c 995)
  • Sindhuraja (c 995-c 1010)
  • Bhoja I (c 1010-c 1055)
  • Jayasimha I (c 1055-c 1060)
  • Udayaditya (c 1060-c 1087)
  • Lakshmanadeva (c 1087-c 1097)
  • Naravarman (c 1097-c 1134)
  • Yasovarman (c 1134-c 1142)
  • Jayavarman I (c 1142-c 1160)
  • Vindhyavarman (c 1160-c 1193)
  • Subhatavarman (c 1193-c 1210)
  • Arjunavarman I (c 1210-c 1218)
  • Devapala (c 1218-c 1239)
  • Jaitugideva (c 1239-c 1256)
  • Jayavarman II (c 1256-c 1269)
  • Jayasimha II (c 1269-c 1274)
  • Arjunavarman II (c 1274-c 1283)
  • Bhoja II (c 1283- ?)
  • Mahlakadeva (c ? -c 1305)
  • Dridhaprahara
  • Seunachandra 850 – 874 CE
  • Dhadiyappa 874 – 900 CE
  • Bhillama I 900 – 925 CE
  • Vadugi (Vaddiga) 950 – 974 CE
  • Dhadiyappa II 974 – 975 CE
  • Bhillama II 975 – 1005 CE
  • Vesugi I 1005 – 1020 CE
  • Bhillama III 1020 – 1055 CE
  • Vesugi II 1055 – 1068 CE
  • Bhillama III 1068 CE
  • Seunachandra II 1068 – 1085 CE
  • Airamadeva 1085 – 1115 CE
  • Singhana I 1115 – 1145 CE
  • Mallugi I 1145 – 1150 CE
  • Amaragangeyya 1150 – 1160 CE
  • Govindaraja 1160
  • Amara Mallugi II 1160 – 1165 CE
  • Kaliya Ballala 1165 – 1173 CE
  • Bhillama V 1173 – 1192 CE, Proclaimed independence from Kalyani Chalukya
  • Jaitugi I 1192 – 1200 CE
  • Singhana II 1200 – 1247 CE
  • Kannara 1247 – 1261 CE
  • Mahadeva 1261 – 1271 CE
  • Amana 1271 CE
  • Ramachandra 1271 – 1312 CE
  • Singhana III 1312 – 1313 CE
  • Harapaladeva 1313 – 1318 CE
  • Mallugi III 1318 – 1334 CE
  • Nripa Kama (1000–1045)
  • Vinayaditya I (1045–1098)
  • Ereyanga (1098–1100)
  • Ballala (1100–1108)
  • Vishnuvardhana (1108–1142)
  • Narasimha I (1142–1173), proclaimed independence from Kalyani Chalukya
  • Ballala II (1173–1220)
  • Narasimha II (1220–1235)
  • Vira Someshwara (1235–1253)
  • Narasimha III and Ramanatha (1253–1295)
  • Ballala III (1295–1342)
  • Bijjala II (1130–1167): proclaimed independence from Kalyani Chalukyas in 1162AD
  • Sovideva (1168–1176)
  • Mallugi –> overthrown by brother Sankama
  • Sankama (1176–1180)
  • Ahavamalla (1180–83)
  • Singhana (1183–84)

Roopak Dynasty (c. 890-895)

Brahmin Shahi Dynasty (c. 890-964)

Janjua Shahi Dynasty (964-1026 AD)

Parmaras of Malwa

Seuna Yadavas of Devagiri (850 – 1334)

Hoysala Dynasty (1000-1346)

Kalachuri (Southern) Dynasty (1130 – 1184)

The Muslim Rule

Delhi Sultanate (1206-1526)

Despite the name, the capital was repeatedly elsewhere than Delhi city, not always near

Mamluk dynasty of Delhi (1206-1290)

Khilji Dynasty (1290-1320)

Tughlaq Dynasty (1321-1398)

Invasion of Timur in 1398 and the end of the Tughluq Dynasty as known earlier.

Sayyid Dynasty (1414-1451)

Lodi Dynasty (1451-1526)

Malwa Sultanate

Ghoris

Khiljis

Under Gujarat (1530–1534)

Qadirid

Under Mughal Empure (1542–1555) (see Mughal Empire)

Shaja’atid

Bahmani Sultanate (1347-1527)

Vijayanagara Empire (1336-1660)

Sangama Dynasty (1336-1487)

Saluva Dynasty (1490-1567)

Tuluva Dynasty (1542-1614)

Qutb Shahi Dynasty (1518-1687)

Mughal Empire (1526-1857)

Mughal Dynasty (first rule, 1526-1540)

Suri Dynasty (1540-1555)

Hindu Raj (1553-1556)

Mughal Dynasty (restored, 1556-1857)

Maratha Empire (1674-1818)

Empire divided between two branches of the family c.1707-10 AD; division formalized in AD 1731.

Chhatrapatis at Satara

State annexed by the British in 1839

Chhatrapatis at Kolhapur

State acceded unto the dominion of India following the independence of India in 1947.

The Peshwas

Technically they were not monarchs, but hereditary prime ministers, though in fact they ruled instead of the Maharaja, and were hegemon of the maratha confederation

Maharajas of Thanjavur

Descended from a brother of Shivaji; ruled independently and had no formal relationship with the Maratha Empire.

State was annexed by the British in 1799

Holkar Maharajas Rulers of Indore

  1. Malharrao Holkar (I) (r. 2 November 1731 – 19 May 1766)
  2. Malerao Khanderao Holkar (r. 23 August 1766 – 5 April 1767)
  3. Punyaslok Rajmata Ahilyadevi Holkar (as a regent) (r. 5 April 1767 – 13 August 1795)
  4. Tukojirao Holkar (I) (r. 13 August 1795 – 29 January 1797)
  5. Kashirao Tukojirao Holkar (r. 29 January 1797 – 1798)
  6. Yashwantrao Holkar (I) (r. 1798 – 27.11.1811)
  7. Malharrao Yashwantrao Holkar (III) (r. November 1811 – 27 October 1833)
  8. Martandrao Malharrao Holkar (r. 17 January 1834 – 2 February 1834)
  9. Harirao Vitthojirao Holkar (r. 17 April 1834 – 24 October 1843)
  10. Khanderao Harirao Holkar (r. 13 November 1843 – 17 February 1844)
  11. Tukojirao Gandharebhau Holkar (II) (r. 27 June 1844 – 17 June 1886)
  12. Shivajirao Tukojirao Holkar (r. 17 June 1886 – 31 January 1903)
  13. Tukojirao Shivajirao Holkar (III) (r. 31 January 1903 – 26 February 1926)
  14. Yashwantrao Holkar (II) (r. 26 February 1926 – 1961)
  15. Usha Devi Maharaj Sahiba Holkar XV Bahadur, Maharani of Indore (r. 1961–present)

Following the independence of India in 1947, the state acceded unto the Dominion of India.

Scindia Rulers of Gwalior

Following the independence of India in 1947, the state acceded unto the Dominion of India.

The major Muslim vassals of the Mughal/British Paramountcy (1707-1856)

Nawabs of Bengal (1707-1770)

Nawabs of Awadh/Oudh (1719-1858)

Nizams of Hyderabad (1720-1948)

Rulers of Mysore/Khudadad (1399-1950)

Wodeyar Dynasty (First rule, 1399-1761)

Reign of the Kings of Mysore (Wodeyar line) is interrupted from 1796 until 1799.

Islamic Rulers of Mysore (1761-1799)

Wodeyar Dynasty (Second rule, 1799-1950)

Sikh Empire (1801-1849)

The British Empire annexed Punjab in c.1845-49 AD; after the First and Second Anglo-Sikh Wars.

Veerakerala Varma nephew of Cheraman Perumal is supposed to be the first king of Cochin (This was around 7th century AD). But the only record we have is from 1503 AD

  1. Unniraman Koyikal I (—- to 1503)
  2. Unniraman Koyikal II (1503 to 1537)
  3. Veera Kerala Varma (1537–1565)
  4. Keshava Rama Varma (1565–1601)
  5. Veera Kerala Varma (1601–1615)
  6. Ravi Varma (1615–1624)
  7. Veera Kerala Varma (1624–1637)
  8. Godavarma (1637–1645)
  9. Veerarayira Varma (1645–1646)
  10. Veera Kerala Varma (1646–1650)
  11. Rama Varma (1650–1656).
  12. Rani Gangadharalakshmi (1656–1658).
  13. Rama Varma (1658–1662).
  14. Goda Varma (1662–1663)
  15. Veera Kerala Varma(1663–1687)
  16. Rama Varma (1687–1693)
  17. Ravi Varma (1693–1697)
  18. Rama Varma (1697–1701)
  19. Rama Varma (1701–1721)
  20. Ravi Varma (1721–1731)
  21. Rama Varma (1731–1746)
  22. Veera Kerala Varma (1746–1749)
  23. Rama Varma (1749–1760)
  24. Veera Kerala Varma (1760–1775)
  25. Rama Varma (1775–1790)
  26. Rama Varma (1790-1805)– SHAKTHAN THAMPURAN
  27. Rama Varma (1805–1809)- Vellarapalli-yil Theepetta Thampuran (King who died in “Vellarapali”)
  28. Veera Kerala Varma (1809–1828) – Karkidaka Maasathil Theepetta Thampuran (King who died in “karkidaka” month(ME))
  29. Rama Varma (1828–1837) – Thulam-Maasathil Theepett1a Thampuran (King who died in “Thulam” month (ME))
  30. Rama Varma (1837–1844) – Edava-Maasathil Theepett1a Thampuran (King who died in “Edavam” month (ME))
  31. Rama Varma (1844–1851) – Thrishur-il Theepetta Thampuran (King who died in “Thrishivaperoor” or Thrishur)
  32. Veera Kerala Varma (1851–1853) – Kashi-yil Theepetta Thampuran (King who died in “Kashi” or Varanasi)
  33. Ravi Varma(1853–1864) – Makara Maasathil Theepetta Thampuran (King who died in “Makaram” month (ME))
  34. Rama Varma(1864–1888) – Mithuna Maasathil Theepetta Thampuran (King who died in “Mithunam” month (ME))
  35. Kerala Varma(1888–1895) – Chingam Maasathil Theepetta Thampuran (King who died in “Chingam” month (ME))
  36. Rama Varma(1895-1914) – aka Rajarshi, Abdicated Highness (Left for heavenly abode in 1932)
  37. Rama Varma(1914–1932) – Madrasil Theepetta Thampuran (King who died in Madras or Chennai)
  38. Rama Varma(1932–1941) – Dhaarmika Chakravarthi (King of Dharma), Chowara-yil Theepetta Thampuran (King who died in “Chowara”)
  39. Kerala Varma (1941–1943) – Midukkan (syn: Smart, expert, great.) Thampuran
  40. Ravi Varma(1943–1946) – Kunjappan Thampuran (Brother of Midukkan Thampuran)
  41. Kerala Varma(1946–1948) – Ikya-Keralam (Unified Kerala) Thampuran
  42. Rama Varma (1948–1964) – Pareekshit Thampuran

ME – Malayalam Era

Kings of India and Pakistan

After independence, but before declarations of republics:

  • George VI, King of India (1947–1950) and King of Pakistan (1947–1952)
  • Elizabeth II, Queen of Pakistan (1952–1956)